SOFIA QUINTERO

Reflections of an Ivy League Homegirl

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Feminist Fiction Friday: “Negrita, Always Choose You.”

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. According to various studies, the female incarceration rate is increasing at alarming rates and one reason is that battered women are being imprisoned for defending themselves. In response to this, amnesty…

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Filed under Amnesty International Black Artemis Domestic Violence Awareness Month hip-hop feminism Michigan Women&039;s Justice and Clemency Project Picture Me Rollin&039; violence against women women in prison

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aeroformexpansion:

I was diagnosed at age 42 in the midst of getting my second master’s degree – an MFA in television writing and production. My classmates and I were in the midst of shooting for the pilot we had co-written when the mammogram I had several weeks earlier revealed an abnormality in my left breast. Putting my health first, I missed two days of production in order to have the biopsy. A week later I got the call. “It’s cancer.”
After initial shock and terror, went into full-on warrior mode which in part meant humbling myself and going to others. My mother is also a breast cancer survivor (no genetic link) and was secretive about her experience; I knew at my core that withdrawing from the world wasn’t the healthiest way for me to handle the illness.
The first person I reached out to was another young Latina in the entertainment industry who was very transparent about her experience. She immediately responded and encouraged me to get a second opinion at New York Presbyterian. After meeting with the competent and compassionate doctors there – especially plastic surgeon Dr. Jeffrey Ascherman – I knew that was the best place for treatment. After every appointment, I walked out feeling like a survivor rather than a patient.
From that first visit, Dr. Ascherman told me that I was a candidate for the XPAND clinical trial. I’m an activist and so anything that can serve the larger good appeals to me. After I researched traditional reconstruction with needles, constant trips to doctor, the pain and discomfort, I realized this was an invitation to be a powerful lantern to light a new path for women.
I hope that the AeroForm becomes the standard of care for all breast cancer survivors in the very near future. No woman who has to face this illness should be denied this easier path to reconstruction. I was intent on learning from this cancer experience and not giving it full power over my life. I thrived during chemotherapy (and worked that baldness as if I were in the running to becoming America’s next top model!) and I continued to do everything I love including my work as a teaching artist. Having so much control over the expansion process enabled me to keep living fully during treatment.
No matter what I do or experience, my deepest desire is to be of inspiration and support to other women as they express their best selves. I never would’ve chosen breast cancer as a way to do that, but asking, “Why me?” is a waste of precious time and energy. The most challenging periods of our lives can be the soil from which our unique greatness can blossom if only we’re willing to get our fingernails dirty.

aeroformexpansion:

I was diagnosed at age 42 in the midst of getting my second master’s degree – an MFA in television writing and production. My classmates and I were in the midst of shooting for the pilot we had co-written when the mammogram I had several weeks earlier revealed an abnormality in my left breast. Putting my health first, I missed two days of production in order to have the biopsy. A week later I got the call. “It’s cancer.”

After initial shock and terror, went into full-on warrior mode which in part meant humbling myself and going to others. My mother is also a breast cancer survivor (no genetic link) and was secretive about her experience; I knew at my core that withdrawing from the world wasn’t the healthiest way for me to handle the illness.

The first person I reached out to was another young Latina in the entertainment industry who was very transparent about her experience. She immediately responded and encouraged me to get a second opinion at New York Presbyterian. After meeting with the competent and compassionate doctors there – especially plastic surgeon Dr. Jeffrey Ascherman – I knew that was the best place for treatment. After every appointment, I walked out feeling like a survivor rather than a patient.

From that first visit, Dr. Ascherman told me that I was a candidate for the XPAND clinical trial. I’m an activist and so anything that can serve the larger good appeals to me. After I researched traditional reconstruction with needles, constant trips to doctor, the pain and discomfort, I realized this was an invitation to be a powerful lantern to light a new path for women.

I hope that the AeroForm becomes the standard of care for all breast cancer survivors in the very near future. No woman who has to face this illness should be denied this easier path to reconstruction. I was intent on learning from this cancer experience and not giving it full power over my life. I thrived during chemotherapy (and worked that baldness as if I were in the running to becoming America’s next top model!) and I continued to do everything I love including my work as a teaching artist. Having so much control over the expansion process enabled me to keep living fully during treatment.

No matter what I do or experience, my deepest desire is to be of inspiration and support to other women as they express their best selves. I never would’ve chosen breast cancer as a way to do that, but asking, “Why me?” is a waste of precious time and energy. The most challenging periods of our lives can be the soil from which our unique greatness can blossom if only we’re willing to get our fingernails dirty.

Filed under breast cancer breast reconstruction women's health